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Yellow Xanax Bar: The “Yellow School Bus” Drug

Yellow Xanax is one form of alprazolam, a benzodiazepine used to treat anxiety disorders and panic attacks. Yellow Xanax is dangerous and can be fake and laced with other drugs like fentanyl. Addiction treatment can help with drug abuse.

Yellow Xanax usually comes in a rectangular yellow pill that resembles a yellow school bus, which is why it has been given its nickname.

Xanax is the brand name for the prescription drug alprazolam, a benzodiazepine or “benzo” that is used to treat anxiety, insomnia, and panic disorders.

Alprazolam is a central nervous system suppressant, meaning it has a calming and sedation effect on the body and mind.

Yellow Xanax pills, like the other types and colors of Xanax, are actually generic alprazolam pills produced by a pharmaceutical company called Actavis Pharma.

Is Yellow Xanax More Addictive Than White Xanax Bars?

Yellow Xanax is not any more addictive than brand-name white Xanax bars produced by the pharmaceutical company Pfizer. They are the same drug and both yellow and white Xanax bars contain 2 mg of alprazolam.

Different colors of Xanax, such as green, may contain higher doses of alprazolam.

Sometimes, Xanax bought on the street is fake and could contain substances like opioids that are very addictive.

What Strength Are Yellow Xanax Bars?

Yellow Xanax bars contain 2 mg of alprazolam. They have three evenly spaced grooves so the pills can be easily divided into 0.5 mg doses.

Yellow Xanax bars usually have the characters “R039” imprinted on them. Seeing these characters does not guarantee that the pills are real. Sometimes counterfeit Xanax pills have these numbers as well.

Common Side Effects Of Yellow Xanax

The side effects of yellow Xanax are the same as any pill containing alprazolam.

Common side effects of yellow Xanax include:

  • drowsiness/sleepiness
  • nausea
  • dizziness
  • slurred speech
  • trouble concentrating
  • blurred vision
  • dry mouth
  • increased anxiety
  • depression
  • suicidal thoughts

Dangers Of Taking Fake Yellow Xanax

Fake yellow Xanax may be produced and sold on the street. While any substance abuse is dangerous, taking fake Xanax has its own set of risks because you never know what is in the pills.

A lot of fake Xanax is laced with the deadly opioid fentanyl. Fentanyl can be fatal even in smaller doses.

Unfortunately, it is impossible to know whether Xanax is fake if it is bought on the street.

People who take Xanax recreationally are adding even more risk to their substance abuse if they buy Xanax on the street.

Other dangers of abusing Xanax include:

  • memory problems
  • mental health disorders like depression and anxiety
  • Xanax withdrawal symptoms if the person stops taking the drug
  • social isolation
  • chest pain and respiratory problems
  • decreased sex drive

Addiction Treatment Options For Xanax Abuse

Xanax is only safe to use when it is used under strict medical advice from healthcare providers. When misused, Xanax can be very addictive and even deadly.

Addiction treatment programs can help to address Xanax misuse. Addressing Xanax abuse usually starts with inpatient detox, before continuing with a treatment program.

Treatment options for Xanax addiction should include evidence-based approaches, such as cognitive behavioral therapy, group counseling, and medications for co-occurring disorders.

The right treatment approach can make the difference between someone making a full recovery from Xanax addiction, or being the victim of a tragedy such as a fatal overdose.

Find Addiction Recovery Services At Bedrock Recovery Center

Bedrock Recovery Center is one of the premier substance abuse treatment centers on the east coast.

Located in Canton, MA, just outside of Boston, Bedrock offers inpatient detox and rehab programs for people facing drug and/or alcohol abuse.

If you or a loved one has been abusing Xanax, substance use treatment might save your life. Call our helpline today to learn more about our recovery programs.

Ready to make a change? Talk to a specialist now.